My Multimodal Tutorial

My entrance into the Information Technology & Digital Media Literacy program at the University of New Haven required a deep submersion into the world of IT with an intensive 9 credit summer course load.  I have spent the past 5 weeks reading online, blogging, screenshooting, screencasting, joining social media platforms and trying out software and apps.  Many of my students have already dabbled in these skills and platforms.  Most are much more proficient in these arenas than I am.  But their parents are not. Therefore, I decided to create my multimodal tutorial on how parents can use Google Classroom as a window into their student’s lives.

In my district, 7th grade is the start of middle school.  Many families struggle with the fine balance between allowing students the independence needed to flourish, allowing too much freedom, or acting like helicopter parents.  Google Classroom allows parents to see every assignment and teacher communication without the dreaded, “What happened at school today?” conversation.  Additionally, it gives parents a glimpse of the new literacies required for success.

In order to make my tutorial I had to request a student login from the IT department in my district.  I had to create 4 pseudo classes and post assignments and
announcements in each course.  I had to analyse multiple screen-cast tools and create a script for my screen-cast.  The process was time-consuming but not especially difficult.  Completing the multimodal has given me a lot of insight into the reality of my requests on students to learn something new.  After many embarrassing takes, my multimodal is finally ready.  I will be presenting this tutorial at our Step Up program where incoming 7th grade parents and students come to Dodd for a sneak peek of their school year.

Click here for my Parent Tutorial on Google Classroom:

And here is a sneak peek of my screen cast:

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6 thoughts on “My Multimodal Tutorial

  1. Keely, this looks very similar to Edmodo. Have you ever used Edmodo, and would you recoomend Classroom over it? I am currently moving all my stuff to Moodle but always like to have a “user friendly” platform to fall back onto. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have not used Edmodo so I can not make a comparison. But Google Classroom is awesome because it creates a Google File Drive for each class and when you add a worksheet it makes a copy of that worksheet for each student and places it in the Google Drive folder. What drove you away from Edmodo and into Moodle?

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  2. Edmodo and Google Classroom are very similar. In my uses, Edmodo is a great tool for connecting students on iPads. Edmodo also tends to be linear in structure. This means that it looks and acts like Facebook. Posts easily get lost in the stream and you have to scroll down/up to find them. Google Classroom is building this stream, or dashboard into the system as well.

    The benefit of Edmodo is that it works well on iPads, and allows you to easily share content with students. This content can be in Dropbox, Google Drive, or the system’s WebDav server. Google Classroom works best with content in GAFE. If you’re using a lot of Google Docs…Classroom works best.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. And…

    Great tutorial. I think you were wise in putting together a tutorial for your parents. Once you start building up your learning hub in the Fall, you can add this content to a page on your site. You’ll be able to share this out with colleagues, parents, etc. This will bring more eyeballs to your content and allow you to edit/revise if you see fit.

    I think the tutorial itself it concise and easy to follow…all while covering the major factors included in use of the tool/system. Good work.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nice tutorial. My school is hoping to go Google Classroom this coming year. This is a great tutorial on many levels. I think it can help more than just parents. I will definitely share with my colleagues.

    Like

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